Thursday, August 10, 2006

Luther on True Faith


Here is a great quote from Luther’s preface to his commentary on Romans on the nature of true faith. This is such a needed truth in our day, when people think they have saving faith because they have walked an aisle, prayed a prayer or even been baptized but there are no active results to this faith. Luther of all people clearly believed that salvation is by faith apart from works, but here he clearly shows that he (following Paul!) believes that true faith must issue in works. The problem is that we, like those in Luther’s day, conceive of faith as “as human figment” rather than as he says “a divine work.” The full quote is very worthwhile.

Faith is not the human notion and dream that some people call faith. When they see that no improvement of life and no good works follow—although they can hear and say much about faith—they fall into the error of saying, “Faith is not enough; one must do works in order to be righteous and be saved.” This is due to the fact that when they hear the gospel, they get busy and by their own powers create an idea in their heart which says, “I believe”; they take this then to be a true faith. But, as it is a human figment and idea that never reaches the depths of the heart, nothing comes of it either, and no improvement follows.

Faith, however, is a divine work in us which changes us and makes us to be born anew of God, John 1[:12-13]. It kills the old Adam and makes us altogether different men, in heart and spirit and mind and powers; and it brings with it the Holy Spirit. O it is a living, busy, active, mighty thing, this faith. It is impossible for it not to be doing good works incessantly. It does not ask whether good works are to be done, but before the question is asked, it has already done them, and is constantly doing them. Whoever does not do such works, however, is an unbeliever. He gropes and looks around for faith and good works, but knows neither what faith is nor what good works are. Yet he talks and talks, with many words, about faith and good works.

Faith is a living, daring confidence in God’s grace, so sure and certain that the believer would stake his life on it a thousand times. This knowledge of and confidence in God’s grace makes men glad and bold and happy in dealing with God and with all creatures. And this is the work which the Holy Spirit performs in faith. Because of it, without compulsion, a person is ready and glad to do good to everyone, to serve everyone, to suffer everything, out of love and praise to God who has shown him this grace. Thus it is impossible to separate works from faith, quite as impossible as to separate heat and light from fire. Beware, therefore, of your own false notions and of the idle talkers who imagine themselves wise enough to make decisions about faith and good works, and yet are the greatest fools. Pray God that he may work faith in you. Otherwise you will surely remain forever without faith, regardless of what you may think or do.

(HT: Kairos Journal)

2 comments:

Joel Maners said...

For too long I think we have viewed faith as something that we conjure up within ourselves. Over the years I have realized that faith is not so much what we do as it is what God does for us. Faith is simply the gift of God. If you are a person of great faith, it is not because you have studied more, served more,or prayed more (although God can use such times to build your faith). No, if you have faith, it is because, I believe, God placed it there. Conversely, if you find that you have weak faith, you don't rectify the situation by pulling yourself up by your own spiritual bootstraps. You simply ask God for greater faith and act on what faith you do have at the time. So often we have turned to the idol of self sufficiency and called it faith.

Ryan S. said...

That's an excellent quote.